What is Urban Hiking?

What Is Urban Hiking?

“Urban Hiking” keeps popping up as the fastest growing trend in hiking. But what, exactly, is an urban hike? When you want to get outside, or you may not have personal transportation, or you don’t want to drive all the way to the trailhead, maybe it’s time for an urban hike. Rather than mountains and forest, you can find natural beauty and fun obstacles right outside your urban door.

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How’s Urban Hiking Differ from Hiking or Walking?

It’s not hiking.

It’s not walking.

So What Is Urban Hiking?

Urban Hiking is a walk in the city that includes a sense of adventure. It embraces the urban environment by  adventuring through parks, climbing stairwells, crossing intersections, and meandering through the city’s obstacles of life.

You can do urban hikes with your friends or by yourself. When urban hiking, you can be anonymous in a sea of people. Sidewalks, speed bumps, and curbs become your obstacles in your hiking trail to balance, cross, and giggle across.

No Trailheads, No Maps, Per Se

Usually while urban hiking, there are no particular trailheads or maps. There’s no designated trail. You might use urban trails like Denver’s 5280 Trail, the Freedom Trail in Boston, or the Schuylkill River Trail in Philly. But you’re more likely to blaze your own path.

Rather than a walk, which might also involve a neighborhood, a park, and a street, urban hiking involves putting on a pair of shoes that like concrete (the KEEN Gypsum), perhaps packing water and a snack, using public restrooms, and darting between cars, across crosswalks and over creeks. It’s often more strenuous than a walk, can include a local or regional trail, and it might even require your balance across an unbridged creek. The built environment becomes your playground.

Elevators, Stairs and Tree Stumps Make Up Urban Hikes

Elevators  become your climb, stairs are your downhill trek. The focus is on the discovery of an adventure, not on the amount of steps, miles, or laps you’ve completed. You might find a hidden stream, a forgotten pocket park, or an unexplored alley.

It’s an Attitude

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Urban hiking is also an attitude. You’re ready for an urban hike when you’ve decided another walk around the neighborhood is un-thrilling, and you’re excited to discover other areas of your world. You may want to go alone, grab a friend, or join a group. Regardless, you’re eager to discover and break out of the routine, and you don’t/can’t/won’t get to a traditional trailhead at a hike in the woods, the mountains, or the parks.

It’s Not an Adrenaline Rush

Even though you’re ready to break the routine with an urban hike, it’s not about an adrenaline rush. You don’t need special ice picks, climbing cleats, or tents. Although you may know wilderness first aid, you probably won’t use it. 911 calls work on urban hikes. Granted you probably aren’t in fear of a bear on an urban hike, but you might be in fear of a delivery truck running you over.

So Get Out There

Grab your hat, your gear, your sunscreen, and your phone. Go discover urban hiking.

Where Should You Urban Hike First?

For your first urban hike, jump on the local transit, take it to a destination, and do your first urban hike back to your house. Maybe you’ll be on a trail, a street, a road or an alley. Maybe you’ll wade a creek, climb a bank, or cross the commuter bridge. Have fun. Find an adventure.

Favorite Urban Hikes in Denver?

If you would like some good urban hiking suggestions in Denver, be sure to get my book, Best Urban Hikes: Denver, available on Amazon and good bookstores everywhere.

Here are a few urban hikes in Denver that you can do right now: Five Points, Highland, Athmar Park. You can also use the filter on the Hikes page to find hikes by length, location, family friendly, and so on. Have fun!

Post your picture below!

See you on the trail..

~Chris



Taking an Urban Hike through Grand South Park Hill

Taking an Urban Hike through Grand South Park Hill

Park Hill was the mastermind of the quirky and bizarre Baron von Winckler, who fled Prussia in embarrassment and died with a flourish. In between, he built Park Hill, taunted his neighbors, failed at the races, and ultimately scorned everyone. He was, none the less, able to persuade the rich to locate their homes east of City Park and away from the filth of downtown. They purchased the homes along Montview Blvd for $5000, and Park Hill began.

All of Park Hill's history is fabulous. You can read about more of it in my Park Hill/Northeast Park Hill walk, or buy yourself a gift and get The Park Hill Neighborhood book by Noel and Hansen.

Where is Park Hill?

According to the City of Denver, "Park Hill" is actually one large area split into three neighborhoods, North, Northeast, and South Park Hill. Most residents disagree with this division. None the less, because the geography is so big, we've split the neighborhood into two different walks in order to cover all of Park Hill in with two comfortable walks. To see details for walking North and Northeast Park Hill, click here.

South Park Hill, which is south of Park Hill and Northeast Park Hill, shares the same east/west boundaries (Quebec and Colorado) with its northern neighbors, but its southern boundary is Colfax and its northern is E 23rd Ave. This end of Park Hill weighs in with big homes, quaint cottages, and boulevards of Denver's historic founders' homes.

Niched Schools Tucked into Old Buildings

The neighborhood can get heady on the important corners and along the parkway corridors. But intermingled between the big homes are charming bungalows and artful alleys. Holding up the eastern end of neighborhood sit the old Colorado Women's College, now schooling artists at The Denver School of the Arts, and future culinary stars at Johnson & Wales University.

Flying Cows Are Important

Like its northern neighbors, the South Park Hill homes range from large historic mansions from the turn of the century to 1940s-50s homes surviving the World War II boom. There are few scrapes and flips here; the neighborhood seems to want to hold on to its history and charm. Sadly, no parks dot South Park Hill like the ones found in the northern end such as City of Axum and Martin Luther King, Jr Parks, but both 17th Ave and Monaco Parkway hold nice grassy park-like medians. Large trees have matured, providing park-like conditions even where no parks exist.

On this 4-mile walk, you'll want to follow the recommendations of Historic Denver and authors Thomas Noel and William Hansen from their book The Park Hill Neighborhood, following a route that stops at many of the homes mentioned in the book.

The Route:

Start at 1642 Pontiac St. Head south to 16th Ave. Take a right. Take a right on Monaco Parkway, then take a left at the intersection of E 17th Ave Parkway.

Head west to Locust St, take a left. At E 16th Ave, take a right. At Kearney St, take a right. Take a left on 17th, stopping at the corner of Holly.

Check out the house at 1660 Holly. The largest house in Park Hill encompassing 13 lots, the Marsh Mansion was built by the vice-president of the Western Sugar Company. Eventually it became the headquarters of the Bethlehem Fathers, a Catholic Foreign Ministry Society. Currently, it's a private home.

Cross 17th and stop at the NE corner of Holly. At 5609 17th Ave Parkway, you'll find the Walsen House. Restored with individually numbered roof tiles, the Walsen family of the American Bank and Trust enjoyed their custom perennial gardens and garage with a custom car wash.

Continue north on Holly to the quaint cottage at 1735 Holley Street. Home to the Idris/Melrose family of artists and one of the first female advice column writers for the Rocky Mountain News, this darling cottage keeps its charm with cairns and dragons in the yard.

Continue on 17th to Hudson. Stop at 1790 Hudson, the Bondy House. Heavily remodeled shortly after being built, the owners of this home made their fortunes in the auto and the cigar businesses. In 1999, the current owners restored the home by the founder of the Rocky Mountain Map Society, who has helped Denver Public Library improve its map collection.

Take a left on 17th and then a right on Grape. On Montview, take a left, stopping at 5209 Montview, the Park Hill United Methodist Church. Notice the well-done expansion on the east side, the towers and ornate entries.

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Continue west, stopping at the Beeler/Hall House at 5101 Montview Blvd. Owned originally by John Beeler who was vice president and general manager of Denver Tramway who ended his career ultimately in New York, working on its subway system, the home's landscaping was later improved by the Halls. The Halls added gaslights, a perennial garden and other features designed by city planner Saco DeBoers.

Take a right on Forest, then a right on 22nd. Continue on 22nd to the alley between Hudson and Holly. Go south through the alley, enjoying the eclectic collection of art and artwork displayed by the alley residents. At Montview, take a left, then at Holly, take a left, continuing north.

On 22nd, continue to the right to Kearney. Take a break at the darling Cake Crumbs, winner of the Today's Show's best oatmeal cookie in the US. Make sure to buy this delicious treat. After enjoying your treat, continue along 22nd.

Take a right on Monaco, crossing it at Montview. Walk along Montview a few blocks until you get to the Denver School of the Arts. A Denver Public School magnet school, it attracts high-performing students who can major in one of eleven arts, including the performing arts. The campus was the northern buildings of the Colorado Women's College, which crossed Montview. Founded in 1909 to rival Vassar, the Women's College was eventually absorbed by the University of Denver. It is now the The Women's College of the University of Denver.

Cross the street and enter Johnson & Wales University. The Denver campus, one of 4, opened in 2000. JWU has the largest culinary arts program in the US and also graduates students from its Business, Hospitality and Arts & Sciences Colleges. On the campus, veer to the left, taking the sidewalk past the historic buildings, working your way around a semi-circle toward the southern edge of the campus.

After enjoying the campus, exit its southern edge onto Pontiac and return back to where you started.
Click here to see the route, map, and turn by turn directions.

Walking Park Hill and Supporting Denver By Foot

If you’ve enjoyed this walk, maybe you’ll enjoy some other walks curated by Denver By Foot. Get the 52 Hikes 52 Weeks Denver Calendar, which recommends a hike a week, subscribe to the YouTube Channel to hear about weekly hiking suggestions in Denver, and buy access to the Denver By Foot Challenge. The Challenge is 30 activities in Denver to do by foot where you’ll uncover treasures throughout Denver. It’s a great thing to do with friends and family.

Finally, please support Denver By Foot by purchasing Chris Englert’s books, The Best Urban Hikes: Denver and Discovering Denver Parks. Thank you so much!

Did you enjoy this walk? What was the best part? Post your comments below!

~See you on the trail

Chris

 

 

 


An Urban Hike through Denver's Conflicted Affair with MLK, Race Relations, and the KKK

An Urban Hike through Denver's Conflicted Affair with MLK, Race Relations, and the KKK

Martin Luther King, Jr's facade appears on each crossing on MLK Jr Blvd.

Park Hill's giant footprint to the east of City Park is actually divided into three "official" neighborhoods according to the City of Denver. For this walk you will amble through two of the three "neighborhoods", North Park Hill and Northeast Park Hill.

*editorial note: Please note that there is no agenda here to separate the neighborhoods by this route. The geography of "Park Hill" is too big to do in one day. If you would also like to walk the southern portion known as South Park Hill, please read this post with its curated map. You might also want to read this piece about Park Hill's History before taking off, as the info below just barely scratches its surface.

From small bungalows to fancy cottages, the architecture throughout Park Hill varies.

Where Is Park Hill?

Northeast Park Hill is directly north of North Park Hill with the same east-west boundaries of Colorado and Quebec. Northeast Park Hill extends above I70 to 56th Ave, stopping at North Park Hill's northern boundary of Martin Luther King, Jr, Blvd. North Park Hill then continues south to E 23rd Ave.

A variety of homes throughout North and Northeast Park HIll

It's a big neighborhood with a big story. Fashioned out of the prairies and farms to the east of City Park, the neighborhood grew northerly and eventually taking over the original Lowry Field. Barons von Winckler and von Richthofen played a part in establishing Park Hill, and their story fits better in the discussion of south Park Hill and Montclair.

A Segregation Story Starts Here (but Doesn't End.)

Park Hill's neighborhoods tell the a story that keeps unfolding through the names of its streets, parks, schools and churches, and continues to be told through annual MLK Marades, festivals, and daily activities.

Smiley school building

The schools in Park Hill, particularly Barrett and Park Hill Elementary, were the center of a segregation battle that started with Park Hill plaintiffs battling Denver Public Schools. With a case that rose up to the Supreme Court (Keyes v School District 1 Denver), DPS was eventually told to enforce bussing in an attempt to desegregate Denver schools. This decision led the way to national bussing changes in every school district in the country.

MLK, Jr in Park Hill

Martin Luther King, Jr visited Park Hill in 1964, making visits and speeches at Macedonia Baptist Church and then spoke at Montview Boulevard Presbyterian Church. Crowds overflowed the churches, spilling into the streets of Park Hill. King chose Park Hill because of the Park Hill’s community vision to integrate peacefully and its history in the fight for integrated schools.

Although City Park is not in the Park Hill neighborhood, while walking this route, it's important to remember that in City Park is a statue of MLK, Jr. In 1976, Ed Rose took up the challenge of sculpting Martin Luther King, Jr. Many felt that the squat figure of King with Emmett Till, the Mississippi youth whose lynching prompted King into the civil rights movement, should have been more lifelike and not so representative.

The Martin Luther King Jr Memorial Foundation had commissioned the statue and felt the head was too large for the body. Although Rose was finally paid, the statue was moved to the Denver Art Museum’s basement in 1976 and in 2002, it was moved to the Martin Luther King Jr Museum and Cultural Center in Pueblo. A second statue, fashioned by Ed Dwight replaced the original in 2002, and it now stands. It includes King, standing on the shoulders of Mohandas Gandhi, Rosa Parks, Sojourner Truth and Frederick Douglass. Surrounding the statue on the plaza, you’ll find panels depicting relevant moments in civil rights history.

An Historic Home Still Impacts Park Hill Today

As you're walking the route below, notice the house on the corner of 26th Ave and Clermont (4431 E 26th Ave, Denver). This is the home of an anti-KKK advocate, an original Colorado Mountaineer, and a land developer and Tuberculosis healer. Read the story here.

And Finally, New Areas Making Impact in Park Hill Today

Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-Being - Mental Health Center of Denver

The Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-Being has become a centerpiece of Park Hill. Opening its doors to those who need health care, dental care and community care, the Dahlia Campus also offers urban gardening, cooking workshops, and even a fishery!

The walk (see route below) will take you past some of the relevant points of interest, while also enjoying the diversity and community of Park Hill. You might want to reference The Park Hill Neighborhood by Thomas Noel and William Hansen to guide you in your turns.

The Route

Start at 3800 Dahlia Street. Walk east on 38th Ave, stopping in Commonwealth Coffee Roasters for a quick cuppa or a sniff of the roasted coffee. Turn left (north) on Forest and stop in at Mountain Fresh Market to grab a snack. Once you're caffeinated and filled, head east on E 38th Ave to Hudson, turn right.

Continue on Hudson to 37th Ave, then take a right on Holly.

Pass the Hiawatha Davis Rec Center (named after a former City Council member and activist in the black community), taking a left on 33rd Ave.

Take a right on Ivanhoe to MLK, Jr. Turn right to cross over MLK, Jr at Holly. In the median, be sure to notice the brass facades of MLK, Jr in the brick planters. Continue down Holly to 30th, take a left.

Take a right on Ivanhoe. As you approach Smiley campus, you'll be walking the block where the head plaintiff in the DPS desegregation/bussing case's home was bombed. At E 26th, turn right.

The Smiley campus, first named Holly Junior High and then Park Hill Junior High, became the first Junior High in Denver to integrate. The campus is named after William Smiley, a popular DPS Superintendent from 1912-1924.

At Holly, go south. Notice the green terra-cotta tiles capping the domes of the school. At E 25th Ave, take a right.

Take a left on Grape Street and then a right on E 23rd Ave. Cross Elm, and notice the home at 4935 E 23rd Ave, the Johnson/Turnbull house. Built in 1908, this Arts and Crafts home also provided materials for the owner's daughter's home just north on Elm at 2315. Johnson was President of a men's furnishing business and Turnbull pioneered film-making animation here in Colorado.

Go north on Elm. Take a right on E 25th Ave and then a left on Fairfax. Take a left on 26th, then a right on Clermont.

Cross MLK, Jr, and enter the City of Axum Sister City Park. One of several Denver Sister City Parks, this park mirrors its sister in Axum, Ethiopia, birthplace of the Queen of Sheba.

Exit the park to the east along E 33rd Ave, turning north (left) on Dahlia. At the Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-Being - Mental Health Center of Denver, enter the gardens on the east side of the building and enjoy the community gardens and hydroponic fish tanks.

Continue north on Dahlia to return back to where you started.

Click here to see the route, map, and turn by turn directions.

Walking Park Hill and Supporting Denver By Foot

If you’ve enjoyed this walk, maybe you’ll enjoy some other walks curated by Denver By Foot. Get the 52 Hikes 52 Weeks Denver Calendar, which recommends a hike a week, subscribe to the YouTube Channel to hear about weekly hiking suggestions in Denver, and buy access to the Denver By Foot Challenge. The Challenge is 30 activities in Denver to do by foot where you’ll uncover treasures throughout Denver. It’s a great thing to do with friends and family.

Finally, please support Denver By Foot by purchasing Chris Englert’s books, The Best Urban Hikes: Denver and Discovering Denver Parks. Thank you so much!

Did you enjoy this walk? What was the best part? Post your comments below!

~See you on the trail

Chris


An Enjoyable Urban Hike Through Denver's Favored Park, Wash Park

An Enjoyable Urban Hike Through Denver's Favored Park, Wash Park

If you were to say, "Where's Washington Park?" to someone in Denver, you'd get a few screwy looks. Although officially named after our first president, locals have abbreviated these two neighborhoods to Wash and West Wash Park. In Wash Park neighborhood is the park, Wash Park, not to be confused with the neighborhood's name of Wash Park.

Two 'Hoods Sharing a Park, Kinda

Spanning from E Alameda to the north, I25 to the south, S Broadway to the west and S University to the east, these two neighborhoods meet in the middle at S Downing St. If Wash Park is the residential and recreational side of the area, then West Wash is the shopping and entertainment section. But both neighborhoods have cottages and mansions, and both claim Wash Park, the park, as their local getaway.

To learn about the history of the lakes, the buildings and the artwork, buy my book Discovering Denver Parks.

Wash Park, the park, invites walkers, runners, skaters and bikers in a rigid and controlled system of lanes and paths. Step in the wrong path at the wrong speed, and the locals will let you know your error. The park has acres and acres of open space for volleyball, sunbathing, frisbee and outdoor fun. Formal gardens welcome you in the spring and summer, along with paddle boarding and kayaking on the lakes. In the wintertime, if it ever gets cold enough again, you can throw on your ice skates or attach your cross country skies for miles of escape. As an interesting note: the lakes used to separate the men from the women when bathing suits were adorned!

South High School Dominates the Southern Edge

South High School commands the southern end of the area. Once known for its "southern charm," it's now known as the one of the country's most beautiful high schools. With ornate frescoes and facades and a giant football field, this school is here to stay and welcomes all who enter.

The Same, But Different Neighborhoods and Associations

To learn about the history of the lakes, the buildings and the artwork, buy my book Discovering Denver Parks.

Although both neighborhoods have many similarities, they do maintain separate homeowners associations. West Wash has been instrumental, over time, in closing roads and protecting the safety and sanctity of its neighborhoods. Wash Park's association (called East Wash Park Neighborhood Association), on the other hand, has hearkened back to its Myrtle Hill roots. Focusing on a progress and preservation theme, the association focuses on making sure the renovations and growth in and around the neighborhood and its park are appropriate.

Some significant things to look for in the park include beautiful artwork, historic gardens, significant buildings, and interesting playgrounds. The urban hike below takes you by the don't-miss items of the neighborhood, including the famous "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod" statue.

The Route:

Take this urban hike through the neighborhoods of West Wash Park and Wash Park and the park itself, Wash Park. You'll walk about 3 miles if you do this particular route. Click here to see the route, map, and turn by turn directions.

Start at 1059 S Gilpin. Walk south to E Mississippi and then take a right at S Race Street. Pass what was once Myrtle School and then became Washington Park School. It's now condominiums and inside, they've maintained some of the original school character. Pass the United Methodist Church, built in 1919, and take a right on E Arizona.

At the corner of Arizona and Franklin, notice the charming roof line and style of homes at the NE corner.

Walk south through the park, exiting the park, crossing E Louisiana and walk east toward the entrance to South High School. Admire the artwork on the entry and the facade.

Walk back to Louisiana, crossing at the light at S Franklin back into the park. Walk around to the west side of the Grasmere Lake. Cross S Downing St into West Wash Park and head north. Admire the wonderful home built by a ship's architect on the west side of the street between Arizona and Tennessee.

To learn about the history of the lakes, the buildings and the artwork, buy my book Discovering Denver Parks.

At Tennessee, take a left. Take a right at S Ogden St. Take a right at E Ohio, then a left onto Franklin again. Cross the street back into the park, then head north on the inner loop toward Smith Lake.

Pass the traditional gardens, which are in full bloom in the spring and summer. Head toward the old Whitehead Farm. This farmhouse and its field are now a maintenance garage for Denver Park and Rec and outdoor facilities for park users.

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Walk toward the SE corner of the lake and notice the small home on the east side of the street and the white statue. The house, originally owned by Eugene Field, was moved here from Colfax. The statue, created by Sculptor Mabel Landrum Torrey, is a marble interpretation of Field's best known poem, "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod," and is north of the house.

Walk south through the park, taking a left on E Kentucky. Take a right on S Williams St, take a right on E Tennessee, and then a left on Gilpin, returning back to your start.

Walking Wash Park and Supporting Denver By Foot

If you’ve enjoyed this walk, maybe you’ll enjoy some other walks curated by Denver By Foot. Get the free 52 Hikes 52 Weeks Denver Calendar, which recommends a hike a week, subscribe to the YouTube Channel to hear about weekly hiking suggestions in Denver, and buy access to the Denver By Foot Challenge. The Challenge is 30 activities in Denver to do by foot where you’ll uncover treasures throughout Denver. It’s a great thing to do with friends and family.

Finally, please support Denver By Foot by purchasing Chris Englert’s books, The Best Urban Hikes: Denver and Discovering Denver Parks. Thank you so much!

See you on the trail

~Chris

 


Urban Hiking though Denver's Race Barrier in Whittier and Skyland

Urban Hiking through Denver's Race Barrier in Whittier and Skyland

Tucked just east of Five Points is a pair of neighborhoods people often overlook while cruising Martin Luther King Blvd. But that's a shame; Whittier and Skyland have something to say in which all Denverites should listen. Walking these two neighborhoods together is imperative; their history is intertwined in a story of integration. Race Street, particularly, runs through the middle of these two neighborhoods and historically marked Denver's color barrier. Together, these neighborhoods tell the story of remembering. Let's start the story with Whittier.

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Where Is Whittier?

Whittier sits with 23rd Avenue to the south, Martin Luther King Boulevard (32nd) to the north, Downing St. to the west and York St. to the east. Named after John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), an abolitionist poet and a founding member of the American Republican political party, the neighborhood lives and breathes history that melts over from Five Points, jazz music, and Denver's integration story.

The Color Line

While walking the neighborhood, you'll learn many things, including these four interesting treasures. Race St was the historical color line of Denver. In order to recall the history, you can find scant traces of an art project called the Whittier Alley Loop project. from 2015. This project told the story of integration and race through murals, artwork, and stories painted into the street. Although almost completely gone, the Whittier Alley Loop project can still be seen with careful eyes and keen sight.

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The First Female Millionaire and Hair

Along the short loop, you'll learn about treasure number two. Whittier was home to Madam CJ Walker's African-American hair care business. She became the first self-made, female, African-American millionaire, influencing beauty all over the US, the Caribbean, and Mexico. Knocking door to door, she schlepped hair tonic and solutions to an audience who loved her. Although her business didn't stay in Denver, her impact did.

Buffalo Bill's Final Wish

You may know that Buffalo Bill's final wish was to be buried on Lookout Mountain. But did you know he made that wish from right here in Whittier? Treasure number three is an interesting piece of local history as well--the home where Buffalo Bill Cody died! Pony Express rider, war veteran, bison killer and sideshow salesman, the place where he died still remains. Look for his sister's home in the 2900 block of Lafayette. The metal bison in the yard gives him away.

The Local Music Teacher and Political Guru

Morrison Park, named after George C Morrison who is known as the godfather of jazz, centers Whittier as a fourth treasure. Make sure to read the lovely signage and memorial to him, which links him to the historic Five Points jazz scene. He also held political court of many influencers who knew the importance of stopping in to see a community leader.

Jumping to the Skyland

Skyland, more commonly known as North City Park Neighborhood, is bordered by Martin Luther King Boulevard to the north, East 23rd Avenue to the south, Colorado Boulevard to the east and York Street to the west, sitting just east of Whittier and includes the City Park golf course (which currently is closed and is future is uncertain.)

Skyland's neighborhood association, North City Park Civic Association, has been around almost 40 years, and they've posted signs at the neighborhood's entries. Although Skyland doesn't have the more exciting history that Whittier has, it, too has contributed to the area's wax and wane with Five Points and Whittier. While walking in Skyland,, you'll find the typical mix of older homes and 1940s homes, but the 1940s dominate the area. It also includes the historically denoted home of Denver's first black architect (who was blind in one eye!) at 2600 Milwaukee St.

Walking the two neighborhoods together will help you see how the "color line" affected both areas. You'll also see the mix of history, the development of some beautiful pocket parks, and an attempt to keep history alive. This 3.3-mile walk keep you talking about both neighborhoods even after you finish.

 

The Route:

Start at 3019 N Lafayette St. Walk south past the community garden and through the park. Look for the house on the east side of the street that has a buffalo in its yard. That's the death place of Buffalo Bill.

Take a left on E 30th Ave, right on Franklin, then a left on E 29th Ave. Walk south and diagonally through Denver's second oldest park, Fuller Park. Say hello to the dogs in the dog park and pass along Manuel High School. Continue to the east along E 28th Ave.

At the corner of High St and 28th, enjoy the mural on the library. Then, walk up the alley to the west of High Street, seeing the remnants of the Whittler Alley Loop project. Continue up the alley to E 30th.

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Take a right and enjoy the history of Madame CJ. Continue to the east, crossing High and then heading south in the alley behind High St. Take a left on E 28th Ave.

Take a right on Race St, then a left on 26th Ave. Cross York into Skyland. Take a left on Josephine St.

Take a right on E 27t Ave and a left on Elizabeth, a right on E 28th Ave, then a left on Clayton, making your way through Skyland. Notice the variation in homes with the block from turn of the century to modern.

Pass the local schools, then continue to take a right on E 30th Ave, then a left on Fillmore St. Take a left on E 31st Ave, continuing your amble in Skyland.

Cross York again, then at High, take a right. At MLK, take a left, walking through Morrison park and stopping to read its history. At Lafayette, take a left, returning back to your start.

Click here to see the route, map, and turn by turn directions.

Walking Whittier and Skyland and Supporting Denver By Foot

If you’ve enjoyed this walk, maybe you’ll enjoy some other walks curated by Denver By Foot. Get the 52 Hikes 52 Weeks Denver Calendar, which recommends a hike a week, subscribe to the YouTube Channel to hear about weekly hiking suggestions in Denver, and buy access to the Denver By Foot Challenge. The Challenge is 30 activities in Denver to do by foot where you’ll uncover treasures throughout Denver. It’s a great thing to do with friends and family.

Finally, please support Denver By Foot by purchasing Chris Englert’s books, The Best Urban Hikes: Denver and Discovering Denver Parks. Thank you so much!

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